7 Easy Knots for Jewelry Making

7 Easy Knots for Jewelry Making

Whether you are a beginner or intermediate jeweler, learning different tying knots for jewelry can be very beneficial.

Not only are these knots used to fasten the end of your thread, but also, jewelry makers can use them to lengthen or strengthen your existing pieces.

Additionally, knots can also add a decorative element to your jewelry, especially when doing beadwork.

Essentially, your jewelry knots may turn out to be one of the essential parts of your jewelry-making process.

After all, if your jewelry is not all tied together correctly, it could all fall apart. 

Not only are they vital for the hardiness of your jewelry, but these knots can also add nice aesthetic touches to your pieces.

To help you decide which tying knot you should use, we’re going to look at 7 different knots for jewelry making.

 

Whether you are a beginner or intermediate jeweler, learning different tying knots for jewelry can be very beneficial.  Not only are these knots used to fasten the end of your thread, but also, jewelry makers can use them to lengthen or strengthen your existing pieces.  Additionally, knots can also add a decorative element to your jewelry, especially when doing beadwork.  Essentially, your jewelry knots may turn out to be one of the essential parts of your jewelry-making process.  After all, if your jewelry is not all tied together correctly, it could all fall apart.   Not only are they vital for the hardiness of your jewelry, but these knots can also add nice aesthetic touches to your pieces.  To help you decide which tying knot you should use, we’re going to look at 7 different knots for jewelry making.     Knot Tying for Jewelry   Before you begin learning how to tie knots on your jewelry, there are a few things you should consider.  First, make sure that you are using the appropriate thread or cord to work best with your preferred knot. Depending on how you want the final jewelry piece to turn out, your knot may work best with a particular type of stringing medium.  When choosing your thread, you will also want to choose one that will be sturdy enough to support the weight of your jewelry, including beading, pendants, and any other additional items you may add.  Once you have chosen your materials, you may also want to have a clipboard, tweezers, and glue to hold everything securely while you tie knots and hold your knot securely when finished. Even though this is an option, it will help you make tighter and more accurate knots.  After you have gathered all of your supplies, you will need to measure and cut the amount of cord, thread, or other preferred stringing material to the size you need. I recommend sizing up if you are unsure of the exact measurement. That way, you will have enough room for your knot while having a lower chance of making your jewelry too tight.  7 Ways to Tie Knots for Jewelry Overhand Knot The most common knot used for securing beads in jewelry making is the overhand knot. This knot is simple and generally used throughout our daily lives.   The easiest part about the overhand knot? It’s very similar to tying your shoes.  You can also tie a double overhand knot to form a loop.  How to tie an overhand knot: To tie an overhand knot, begin by forming a loop with your thread. To do this, lay one end of your string on top of the other. The knot will be made where the string overlaps.  After you have created the loop, take the end of your string and pass it through.  Then, pull the knot tight. If you want to have an extra layer of security, you can add a bit of glue to the knot to hold it in place.     Square Knot Square knots are often used to add pieces of thread when doing beadwork.        When making a square knot, you may want to use a clipboard to hold the ends of your thread securely.      How to tie a square knot:    To tie a square knot, place 4 pieces of thread under your clipboard.     Then, hold one end of every other (2) piece of thread on each hand.     Take the end of the string in your right hand over and under the string in your left hand.     Next, move the end of the string in your left hand over and under the end of the string in your right hand.     To tighten your square knot, pull both ends of your thread at the same time.  Lark’s Head Knot The lark’s head knot is another simple knot that you can quickly learn as a beginner jewelry maker.     Often used in macrame, this knot can also help in beadwork and jewelry making. It is especially great to use when adding a pendant or big piece to your jewelry, as this knot will hold it in place.     Since both sides of the lark’s head knot are going to look different, I recommend practicing before adding it to your jewelry. That way, you can pick which side you want to be seen primarily.        Regardless of how you choose to do this not, it is not recommended as a way to tie off the end of your jewelry.  How to tie a lark’s head knot: To tie a lark’s head knot, begin by folding your cord in half.      After you fold it, put the loop end through your chosen object and pull it through.     To tighten your knot, pull the ends of your cord until the loop is secure around your added object.  Sliding Knot Even though the sliding knot can be slightly more challenging to learn than some of the other knots listed, it is definitely the best way to create adjustable jewelry.     Sliding knots work best with leather cords, satin strings, or any slightly thick and heavy cord.     How to tie a sliding knot:    To tie a sliding knot, start by crossing each end of your cord. You want the end of the cord in your left hand to be in front of the end of the cord in your right hand.        After you have crossed them, wrap the left cord around the right one. Then, wrap it around the right again. Once more, wrap it around the right again. You should now have 3 loose loops around the right cord.     After you have made your loops, take the end on your cord to the first loop you made and pull it through all three loops.     You will then need to tighten your knot by pulling on the very end of your cord.     Once you have finished this side, repeat each step on the other side of your cord to make an identical knot.      To make your cords even, trim off the excess on each end. But, remember to leave room for tightening and loosening your sliding knot as needed.     Surgeon’s Knot    Time for our most recommended knot for stretch bracelets. This knot gets its name because it is actually the exact type of knot that surgeons use when securing suture threads.     Although a surgeon’s knot is a bit more challenging to make, it is one of the most secure knots in jewelry making.     The surgeon’s knot is very similar to the square knot, but it has an extra loop.     If you do not want your knot to come undone, this is a great knot to learn.     How to tie a surgeon’s knot:    Overlap each of the two ends of your thread.     Then, make a loop and put one thread through twice.     When you are ready to tighten the knot, pull each end of your thread simultaneously.        If there is any excess thread remaining, you can easily trim it off.      Half-hitch Knot    The half-hitch knot is mainly used in beadwork to either hold beads in place or add new thread.     This knot is easily compared to the overhand knot, except you will typically be tying this around an added object.     How to tie a half-hitch knot: To tie a half-hitch knot, begin by forming a loop around your object.     Next, put the end of your string around the static string and pull it through the loop.      To tighten the knot around your object, lightly pull your strings.     If you want to ensure the security of your knot, I recommend adding a second half-hitch knot when finished.      Josephine Knot Last but not least, we are going to discuss the Josephine knot.     This knot is another one that is often used in macrame but works great for jewelry making whether you want to add a decorative touch or hold something in place.     To really show the beauty of this knot, you will want to use thicker cords like hemp, paracord, or nylon.     How to tie a Josephine knot:    To practice tying a Josephine knot, you will want to have 4 strands of thread. To easily do this, cut 2 long strands, fold each in half together, and tie with a small loop.     After you have your cords together, make a loop with the 2 left cords.     Then, place the 2 right cords on top of the left loop.     Place the bottom of the right cords under the bottom of the left cords.     Now, take the same 2 right cords and loop them over the top of the left cords and through that loop.     Then, all you have to do is pull each set of cord to tighten your knot.     What to Remember when Tying Knots for Jewelry    Tying jewelry knots may not seem like a simple task, but it definitely does not have to be complicated.     Whether you use the sliding knot, Josephine knot, half-hitch knot, overhand knot, surgeon’s knot, or square knot, I am optimistic that your jewelry will turn out beautiful and functional.     If you use any of these knots, I’d love to see how it turned out.     What is your favorite knot for jewelry making? Let me know in the comments.     FAQ:     How do I know which knot to use?     These knots can generally be used interchangeably. You will want to choose your jewelry knots depending on how you want that piece of jewelry to look. Another thing you may want to consider is the functionality of each piece. I recommend finding a knot that you are comfortable tying. Once you find one that you like, try to stick with it for a while in the beginning. Then, after you have mastered it, begin trying to tie a different knot. Soon, you will know all of the common knots for jewelry and can make your own decision based on each piece you create.     Are these knots for jewelry?      Although many different occupations and hobbies can use the previous knots mentioned, this article bases them solely around jewelry making. Each of these knots is used when making jewelry, such as bracelets and necklaces.

Knot Tying for Jewelry  

Before you begin learning how to tie knots on your jewelry, there are a few things you should consider.

First, make sure that you are using the appropriate thread or cord to work best with your preferred knot. Depending on how you want the final jewelry piece to turn out, your knot may work best with a particular type of stringing medium.

When choosing your thread, you will also want to choose one that will be sturdy enough to support the weight of your jewelry, including beading, pendants, and any other additional items you may add.

Once you have chosen your materials, you may also want to have a clipboard, tweezers, and glue to hold everything securely while you tie knots and hold your knot securely when finished. Even though this is an option, it will help you make tighter and more accurate knots.

After you have gathered all of your supplies, you will need to measure and cut the amount of cord, thread, or other preferred stringing material to the size you need. I recommend sizing up if you are unsure of the exact measurement. That way, you will have enough room for your knot while having a lower chance of making your jewelry too tight.

7 Ways to Tie Knots for Jewelry

1. Overhand Knot

The most common knot used for securing beads in jewelry making is the overhand knot. This knot is simple and generally used throughout our daily lives. 

The easiest part about the overhand knot? It’s very similar to tying your shoes.

You can also tie a double overhand knot to form a loop.

How to tie an overhand knot:

To tie an overhand knot, begin by forming a loop with your thread. To do this, lay one end of your string on top of the other. The knot will be made where the string overlaps.

After you have created the loop, take the end of your string and pass it through.

Then, pull the knot tight. If you want to have an extra layer of security, you can add a bit of glue to the knot to hold it in place.

2. Square Knot

Square knots are often used to add pieces of thread when doing beadwork.

When making a square knot, you may want to use a clipboard to hold the ends of your thread securely. 

How to tie a square knot:

To tie a square knot, place 4 pieces of thread under your clipboard.

Then, hold one end of every other (2) piece of thread on each hand. 

Take the end of the string in your right hand over and under the string in your left hand.

Next, move the end of the string in your left hand over and under the end of the string in your right hand.

To tighten your square knot, pull both ends of your thread at the same time.

3. Lark’s Head Knot

The lark’s head knot is another simple knot that you can quickly learn as a beginner jewelry maker.

Often used in macrame, this knot can also help in beadwork and jewelry making. It is especially great to use when adding a pendant or big piece to your jewelry, as this knot will hold it in place.

Since both sides of the lark’s head knot are going to look different, I recommend practicing before adding it to your jewelry. That way, you can pick which side you want to be seen primarily.

Regardless of how you choose to do this not, it is not recommended as a way to tie off the end of your jewelry.

How to tie a lark’s head knot:

To tie a lark’s head knot, begin by folding your cord in half. 

After you fold it, put the loop end through your chosen object and pull it through.

To tighten your knot, pull the ends of your cord until the loop is secure around your added object.

4. Sliding Knot

Even though the sliding knot can be slightly more challenging to learn than some of the other knots listed, it is definitely the best way to create adjustable jewelry.

Sliding knots work best with leather cords, satin strings, or any slightly thick and heavy cord.

How to tie a sliding knot:

To tie a sliding knot, start by crossing each end of your cord. You want the end of the cord in your left hand to be in front of the end of the cord in your right hand.

After you have crossed them, wrap the left cord around the right one. Then, wrap it around the right again. Once more, wrap it around the right again. You should now have 3 loose loops around the right cord.

After you have made your loops, take the end on your cord to the first loop you made and pull it through all three loops.

You will then need to tighten your knot by pulling on the very end of your cord.

Once you have finished this side, repeat each step on the other side of your cord to make an identical knot. 

To make your cords even, trim off the excess on each end. But, remember to leave room for tightening and loosening your sliding knot as needed.

5. Surgeon’s Knot

Time for our most recommended knot for stretch bracelets. This knot gets its name because it is actually the exact type of knot that surgeons use when securing suture threads.

Although a surgeon’s knot is a bit more challenging to make, it is one of the most secure knots in jewelry making.

The surgeon’s knot is very similar to the square knot, but it has an extra loop.

If you do not want your knot to come undone, this is a great knot to learn.

How to tie a surgeon’s knot:

Overlap each of the two ends of your thread.

Then, make a loop and put one thread through twice.

When you are ready to tighten the knot, pull each end of your thread simultaneously.

If there is any excess thread remaining, you can easily trim it off. 

6. Half-hitch Knot

The half-hitch knot is mainly used in beadwork to either hold beads in place or add new thread.

This knot is easily compared to the overhand knot, except you will typically be tying this around an added object. 

How to tie a half-hitch knot:

To tie a half-hitch knot, begin by forming a loop around your object.

Next, put the end of your string around the static string and pull it through the loop. 

To tighten the knot around your object, lightly pull your strings.

If you want to ensure the security of your knot, I recommend adding a second half-hitch knot when finished.

7. Josephine Knot

Last but not least, we are going to discuss the Josephine knot.

This knot is another one that is often used in macrame but works great for jewelry making whether you want to add a decorative touch or hold something in place.

To really show the beauty of this knot, you will want to use thicker cords like hemp, paracord, or nylon.

How to tie a Josephine knot:

 

To practice tying a Josephine knot, you will want to have 4 strands of thread. To easily do this, cut 2 long strands, fold each in half together, and tie with a small loop.

After you have your cords together, make a loop with the 2 left cords.

Then, place the 2 right cords on top of the left loop.

Place the bottom of the right cords under the bottom of the left cords.

Now, take the same 2 right cords and loop them over the top of the left cords and through that loop.

Then, all you have to do is pull each set of cord to tighten your knot.

What to Remember when Tying Knots for Jewelry

Tying jewelry knots may not seem like a simple task, but it definitely does not have to be complicated. 

Whether you use the sliding knot, Josephine knot, half-hitch knot, overhand knot, surgeon’s knot, or square knot, I am optimistic that your jewelry will turn out beautiful and functional.

If you use any of these knots, I’d love to see how it turned out.

What is your favorite knot for jewelry making? Let me know in the comments.

 

FAQ:

How do I know which knot to use?

These knots can generally be used interchangeably. You will want to choose your jewelry knots depending on how you want that piece of jewelry to look. Another thing you may want to consider is the functionality of each piece. I recommend finding a knot that you are comfortable tying. Once you find one that you like, try to stick with it for a while in the beginning. Then, after you have mastered it, begin trying to tie a different knot. Soon, you will know all of the common knots for jewelry and can make your own decision based on each piece you create.

Are these knots for jewelry? 

Although many different occupations and hobbies can use the previous knots mentioned, this article bases them solely around jewelry making. Each of these knots is used when making jewelry, such as bracelets and necklaces.

 

 

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Comments

Dianne McKay - May 6, 2021

Is there a tutorial video on showing the different way to tie knots on jewelry

Mona - May 6, 2021

Thank you for such an informative article and so well explained. I could visualize it as I was reading it.

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